This Open Educational Resource (OER)

Instructions for Using This Open Educational Resource (OER)

  1. Introduction to This OER: Organizing Information in Information Agencies
  2. Structure to the OER: Modules
  3. Overview of Course Topics by Module
  4. Introduction to the Module “Welcome” Pages

Introduction to This OER:
Organizing Information in Information Agencies

Organizing Information in Information Agencies

by Heather Moulaison-Sandy, Felicity Dykas and Helena Marvin

The textbook for this course is entitled Organizing Information in Information Agencies. This textbook was published as an open educational resource (OER) and was funded in part by the University of Missouri System as part of a competitive grant process.

What Are Open Educational Resources (OERs)?

According to Wikipedia, Open educational resources(OER)s:

are freely accessible, openly licensed text, media, and other digital assets that are useful for teaching, learning, and assessing as well as for research purposes.

This textbook is composed entirely of freely accessible materials, and all content written by the authors is provided under a CC license (see below).

About the Authors

Authored by Heather Moulaison-Sandy and Felicity Dykas, this OER represents over 50 years’ worth of combined experience working, teaching, and researching in the field. Contributor Helena Marvin, the Institutional Repository Librarian at the University of Missouri-St. Louis recrafted their work into the version you’ve found and made minor changes along the way.

 

The content was developed as an open educational reAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0)source (OER); It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International(CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) license.

 

In an effort to provide high-quality, open, and updated information, a number of trusted and vetted online sources, including Wikipedia, have been selected for inclusion. All sources, including links to illustrative images, were live at the time of writing. Updates to this OER content will be carried out every few years. If you would like to alert the authors to changes or additions, please email both at their university email addresses.

Structure to the OER: Modules

Modules

The content of this course is divided into units of instruction referred to as “modules.” The modules follow a consistent routine in an effort to help you always know what is expected of you during any given week.

  • The first item you will see in every module is an introduction to the module. This page lists learning objectives for the module, essential questions to consider as you work through the course material, and a brief introduction to the topic.
  • The next section is the bulk of the instructional content in various forms, including content, links to articles, book chapters, journals, websites, videos, etc. All links are to freely available resources.
  • The next section, “For Further Study,” includes links to additional resources that serve as a point of departure for learning more. These are optional resources to consult if you’ve completed the week’s content early or if you have an interest in the topic.

Each Module contains the content for one week of class.

Overview of Course Topics by Module

Part I: Introduction to Essential Concepts

What This Part Covers: In this Part, you will learn about information, what we mean by “organization of information” and “information retrieval.”

Module 1. Perspectives on Information (and Its Organization)

Module 2. Introduction to Retrieval and Retrieval Systems Tools

Module 3. Organization in LAMS (Principles, Key Terms, Ideas, Products of Cultural Heritage Institutions)

Module 4. Historical Approaches to IO and Key Players

Part II: Metadata to Support Organization of Information

What This Part Covers: In this part, you will learn about a variety of kinds of metadata used to organize material for retrieval in information agencies.

Module 5.Descriptive Metadata

Module 6. Subject Access and Categorization

Module 7. Other Kinds of Metadata

Part III: Systems to Support Organization of Information

What This Part Covers: In this part, you will learn about the technology used to allow access in IO environments. This technology is known as “systems” and it relies on databases, specialized search engines, and encoded information.

Module 8. Systems and System Design in Catalogs

Module 9. Systems and System Design in Digital Libraries

Module 10. Focus: Linked Data

Module 11. Other Content and Other Systems for IO (PIM, RDM, DAMS, etc.)

Part IV: Ethics in Organization of Information

What This Part Covers: In this part, we focus on improving IO as a field—where the field of IO is going, and how it can better make an impact.

Module 12. For-Profit Information Systems

Module 13. Universal KOSs: Representing Users and Meeting their Needs

Module 14. Data about People in IO

Module 15. Being an Ethical Information Intermediary

Introduction to the Module “Welcome” Pages

Each Module will begin with information about the Learning Objectives, Essential Questions, and a brief Rationale.

Learning Objectives
HINT: Learning Objectives cover what you should plan to get out of class each week.

  • Bullet points list aspects of the topic students should understand before moving on.
  • Keeping these learning objectives in mind should help situate the readings and provide additional structure for understanding how the topics covered in the module apply to the “Part.”
  • Organizing information is essential, but it is also complex. These Learning Objectives are designed to help keep you on track.

Essential Questions
HINT: These will give you some big-picture questions to consider as you move through the Module, and again once you’re finished. The answers will not be immediately evident and should take a little brain-work to think through.

  • What is covered in this Module? What ISN’T covered? Why?
  • How is this similar to and different from the work that drew you to library and information science (LIS)?
  • What is *essential* about the content covered in this Module?
  • You are not formally responsible for the Essential Questions, but they will help guide your reflection as you consider the topics covered in the Module and prepare to move forward.

Rationale

HINT: In the Rationale section, you’ll get insight into the big picture of why the topics included in the module are important.

Be sure to come back to the Learning Objectives and the Essential Questions each week after you finish the readings to make sure you’re on the right track. Some help will be provided in the follow-up at the end of each Module.

License

Icon for the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

Organizing Information in Information Agencies by Moulaison-Sandy, H. & Dykas, F. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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